How Do You Watch Free Online HD Porn Videos? Your Viewer Profile Explained

Science has been studying the effects of pornography for decades, and have finally released some trends.

Whether or not you watch pornography, or occasionally skim the internet for some sizzling adult content, you’ve almost definitely come across one headline or another decrying the depravity of mainstream porn and the chilling hold it possesses over our society. Rotting our children’s minds, stealing our husbands, and abusing our women. While these articles are often written either for their shock factor alone, or because their authors genuinely believe this is just the logical outcome of having free online porn videos in society- it’s not exactly true.

 

“Of course there are certain people who abuse free online porn videos, or use them to abuse themselves,” Say experts at Porndoe, a website that offers tons of adult content. “But in factuality, the majority of pornography viewers have a very healthy relationship with porn. It doesn’t wreck their lives or their relationships.” Porndoe isn’t the only place that is verifying this conclusion either, as sociological and psychological studies have shown that while porn may not be good for you, for the majority of the world, it’s not bad either.

The Free Online Porn Video Archetypes

A recent study has revealed that there are three major types of porn viewing styles, or profile archetypes, that most every porn viewer fits comfortably into. The study was impressive in the way that most viewers showed little deviation from the traits of their profiles. Where it was rare that there was much spill over into one category or another. Giving I get researchers a pretty clear picture of how free online porn videos affect those that consume them- and the greater public at large.

Recreational

By far the largest group of the study, with 75.5% of all pornography consumers falling into this category, the recreational profile suggests that for three-quarters of all people who view adult materials, do so in a healthy way. Recreational viewers reported a higher level of sexual satisfaction in their lives- both on and off line. They also reported lower levels of sexual compulsivity, avoidance, and dysfunction. Meaning that regularly viewing online pornography helped them to balance their libidos and find greater sexual satisfaction in their normal, everyday lives.

Distressed

Highly-distressed, but still not considered compulsive, viewers made up 12.7% of consumers of free online porn videos. These are the consumers that viewed the online content less often, but also reported a lower level of sexual satisfaction. While they reported less sexual compulsivity, they did report higher levels of avoidance and dysfunction. Suggesting inborn issues with libido or sexuality. These users are not typical pornography consumers, and find no real benefit to viewing porn online.

Compulsive

Compulsive viewers of online adult content both make up the most damaging and severe profile of users, but also the smallest. At only 11.8% of total pornography viewers; compulsive archetypes report the highest levels of dissatisfaction. They also report extremely high levels of compulsivity and avoidance. This category is the most problematic, because of the negative repercussions that online porn consumption has on their everyday lives.

 

Discussing the Profiles

A common misconception and misrepresentation of pornography users, particularly in mainstream media and criticism of the genre is that porn is viewed only by cis males, and will easily destroy your base sexual function. Despite the widespread dissemination of this view, scientists have found no evidence to back it up.

 

On the contrary, studies like the one mentioned above actually find that the opposite is true, where women and couples were found to be the majority of participants in the recreational group. Which tells us that not only are women and alt-sexualities participating in consuming free online porn videos, but they are also seeing some serious benefit. Porn consumption is defined by the user, not the porn itself. This tells us that while online pornography may be ubiquitous, and can have some themes that do not appeal to all audiences, there is still a place for pornography within our adult relationships. As well as our adult solo sexual lives.

 

There is also good evidence to support that there are communities of people that don’t really care about porn altogether. Where it poses neither a problem, nor a solution, to their sexual functionalities. These are profiled in the distressed archetype, where users reported little action with pornography and little or no need to consume it. Which goes against most anti-pornography rhetoric.

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